Wednesday Jul 1, 2015

Laurence Fishburne to star in 'Roots' miniseries remake

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Laurence Fishburne is joining the "Roots" miniseries remake. A&E Networks said Wednesday that Fishburne will play writer Alex Haley, whose novel about his African-American ancestry was the basis of the original TV miniseries. The new...
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TV

Laurence Fishburne to star in 'Roots' miniseries remake
Wednesday Jul 1, 2015
Laurence Fishburne to star in 'Roots' miniseries remake

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Laurence Fishburne is joining the "Roots" miniseries remake. A&E Networks said Wednesday that Fishburne will play writer Alex Haley, whose novel about his African-American ancestry was the basis of the original TV miniseries. The new project will draw on the late Haley's novel, "Roots: The Saga of an American Family," along with new research, A&E said. The 1977 ABC miniseries was a ratings sensation. Fishburne is a Tony Award-winning stage actor ("Two Trains Running") and Oscar nominee ("What's Love Got to Do With It"). He's become a familiar presence on TV in series including "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation," ''Hannibal" and ABC's comedy "black-ish." No air date or other casting has been announced for the "Roots" remake that will debut simultaneously on the History, A&E and Lifetime channels. Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Anthony Mackie cast as Martin Luther King Jr. in 'All The Way'
Wednesday Jul 1, 2015
Anthony Mackie cast as Martin Luther King Jr. in 'All The Way'

HBO movie "All the Way," directed by Jay Roach and executive produced by Steven Spielberg, will star Anthony Mackie as Martin Luther King Jr.Known most recently for his role as Captain America's friend Falcon in "The Winter Soldier," Anthony Mackie now has a new challenge: playing the role of Martin Luther King Jr. in the upcoming HBO movie All the Way. Mackie will star opposite Bryan Cranston of "Breaking Bad," who will be playing US president Lyndon B. Johnson. Cranston has already played this role in the original stage, version of "All the Way" from 2013-2014. "All the Way" is set to start filming in September 2015, and there remain some key roles to be filled. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Jim Caviezel to receive award from Jimmy Stewart Museum
Wednesday Jul 1, 2015
Jim Caviezel to receive award from Jimmy Stewart Museum

INDIANA, Pa. (AP) — Jim Caviezel is being honored by a Pennsylvania museum dedicated to actor Jimmy Stewart. Caviezel stars in the TV series "Person of Interest" and became widely known for his role in the movie "The Passion of the Christ." He will receive the Harvey Award at an Aug. 29 fundraiser by the Jimmy Stewart foundation. The foundation and museum are based in Stewart's hometown of Indiana, Pennsylvania, about 45 miles northeast of Pittsburgh. Past winners include Carol Burnett, Janet Leigh and Shirley Jones. The Harvey Award is named for the 1950 film in which Stewart befriends an invisible rabbit. It's typically given to someone with connections to Stewart. The foundation says "Caviezel's personal relationship with Jimmy Stewart acted as a catalyst to his own success as an actor." ___ Online: http://www.jimmy.org Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Neve Campbell signed up for 'House of Cards'
Wednesday Jul 1, 2015
Neve Campbell signed up for 'House of Cards'

Neve Campbell is set to join the series "House of Cards".The "Scream" actress will star alongside existing cast members Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright for season 4 of the show, Deadline reports. The exact character to be taken on by Campbell in the White House political drama, produced by Netflix, is not yet known. The actress is also appearing in the second season of the NBC comedy "Welcome To Sweden". Filming for House of Cards is scheduled to start this summer, with season 4 airing in 2016.          Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

'Ballers' looks at humor, drama in the lives of pro athletes
Tuesday Jun 30, 2015
'Ballers' looks at humor, drama in the lives of pro athletes

MIAMI (AP) — Omar Benson Miller spent three seasons on "CSI: Miami," but only this past year did he get a chance to film a television show in South Florida. "It was Miami at the best time to be in Miami: In the winter, which is just the mildest climate," Miller said. "They can sign me up for another 10 years of that." Miller appears on "Ballers," HBO's new series that airs at 10 p.m. EDT Sundays. It stars Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson as a retired football star trying to start a second career as a financial manager, goaded by his boss — played by Rob Corddry — to "monetize" his friendships. The show was created by Stephen Levinson, whose previous credits include HBO's "Entourage." Miller plays a reluctantly retired NFL lineman who's trying to adjust to life after the game as a car salesman. "He's very into his wife and into family," Miller said. "He was really into football, but now he's trying to transition into being a normal member of society." During his time on "CSI: Miami," Miller was shooting scenes in Long Beach, California rather than South Beach. His fancy crime lab was built on a sound stage, and the building that served as its exterior was actually a federal credit union. But the cast and crew of "Ballers" didn't use sets when they filmed around Miami last year. "Every place that we shot was an actual location," Miller said. "It really did a lot to keep it authentic." The show features an ensemble of actors playing current and former players, focusing on their personal and professional struggles. Miller said being on HBO lets them explore adult themes that enhance both the comedy and the drama. "It's a wild ride, but if you're open to some fun, you're going to have a good time with it," Miller said. Executive producer Evan Reilly said the idea for the show came from a conversation several years ago between Levinson and a professional football player at a South Beach hotel. While developing the show, writers pulled material from real athletes and others involved in professional sports. "We spoke to a lot of professional athletes, both current and retired, and got a lot of their stories and a lot of their points of view," Reilly said. "Same goes for agents and people in the front office or (with) professional teams — people who live and work in this world." The show's creators decided to set the show in South Florida because of its draw for athletes from all over the country. "It's set in Miami because it's really a hotbed for professional athletes in the offseason and after retirement," Reilly said. The setting also worked out logistically for the show's star. Johnson owns a home in South Florida, and while he never played in the NFL like his character, he was a backup defensive tackle on the 1991 University of Miami national championship team. "It's great for him to be able to do movies most of the year, do all the things that he does with WWE (World Wrestling Entertainment), and then be able to go home for three months or so and work on the show," Evans said. "It's not something he gets to do too often, so hopefully he'll get to do it for a few more years." Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by David Fischer from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Movies

'A Gay Girl in Damascus' trailer now available
Wednesday Jul 1, 2015
'A Gay Girl in Damascus' trailer now available

The trailer for "A Gay Girl in Damascus: The Amina Profile," the acclaimed documentary by Canadian director Sophie Deraspe, is now available for viewing.A teaser for the cautionary tale about the internet is has been released by IFC Films. The film portrays Sandra Bagaria, a woman living in Montreal who develops an online relationship with a Syrian girl named Amina. As she blogs about life in a country where homosexuality is outlawed, Amina soon becomes an internet sensation. It is only when Amina goes missing that an international search exposes her true identity. The compelling documentary takes viewers on a number of twists and turns in a story whose ending may still come as a surprise to those who have not followed the real-life story. "A Gay Girl in Damascus" will be released in cinemas and digitally on Sundance Now on July 24. Watch the trailer: https://youtu.be/fwjBvII-Qws Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Monopoly the board game, headed for the big screen
Wednesday Jul 1, 2015
Monopoly the board game, headed for the big screen

Lionsgate and manufacturer Hasbro have announced that the popular trading board game Monopoly will have its very own movie.It was announced on July 1 that one of the world's favorite family board games, Monopoly, is set to have its name in lights. Oscar-nominated and BAFTA award-winning writer/producer/director Andrew Niccol will write a screenplay based on the adventures of a boy from Baltic Avenue who uses Chance and Community along his journey. Niccol was the screenwriter behind "The Truman Show," "Gattaca" and "The Terminal." The movie will be produced by Lionsgate and Hasbro’s Allspark Pictures, and financed by Lionsgate. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Anthony Mackie cast as Martin Luther King Jr. in 'All The Way'
Wednesday Jul 1, 2015
Anthony Mackie cast as Martin Luther King Jr. in 'All The Way'

HBO movie "All the Way," directed by Jay Roach and executive produced by Steven Spielberg, will star Anthony Mackie as Martin Luther King Jr.Known most recently for his role as Captain America's friend Falcon in "The Winter Soldier," Anthony Mackie now has a new challenge: playing the role of Martin Luther King Jr. in the upcoming HBO movie All the Way. Mackie will star opposite Bryan Cranston of "Breaking Bad," who will be playing US president Lyndon B. Johnson. Cranston has already played this role in the original stage, version of "All the Way" from 2013-2014. "All the Way" is set to start filming in September 2015, and there remain some key roles to be filled. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

'Minions' at top of UK box office: most successful opening for animated film
Wednesday Jul 1, 2015
'Minions' at top of UK box office: most successful opening for animated film

"Jurassic World" has been dislodged from the top spot of the UK box office as "Minions" makes more in its debut than any other animated film.Over its opening period, the Universal Studios' animated film "Minions" has not only pushed Jurassic World off the number one box office spot, but it has also beaten "Toy Story," and even "Frozen," to become the most lucrative of its genre. After its debut three weeks, "Minions" had already doubled that of "Jurassic World" with an estimated $18.2 million. Its closest rival was "Toy Story," back in 2010, which reached $18.0 million. "Minions," the spin-off of the "Despicable Me" franchise is set to be released in the US on July 10. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Neve Campbell signed up for 'House of Cards'
Wednesday Jul 1, 2015
Neve Campbell signed up for 'House of Cards'

Neve Campbell is set to join the series "House of Cards".The "Scream" actress will star alongside existing cast members Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright for season 4 of the show, Deadline reports. The exact character to be taken on by Campbell in the White House political drama, produced by Netflix, is not yet known. The actress is also appearing in the second season of the NBC comedy "Welcome To Sweden". Filming for House of Cards is scheduled to start this summer, with season 4 airing in 2016.          Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Events

Laurence Fishburne to star in 'Roots' miniseries remake
Wednesday Jul 1, 2015
Laurence Fishburne to star in 'Roots' miniseries remake

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Laurence Fishburne is joining the "Roots" miniseries remake. A&E Networks said Wednesday that Fishburne will play writer Alex Haley, whose novel about his African-American ancestry was the basis of the original TV miniseries. The new project will draw on the late Haley's novel, "Roots: The Saga of an American Family," along with new research, A&E said. The 1977 ABC miniseries was a ratings sensation. Fishburne is a Tony Award-winning stage actor ("Two Trains Running") and Oscar nominee ("What's Love Got to Do With It"). He's become a familiar presence on TV in series including "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation," ''Hannibal" and ABC's comedy "black-ish." No air date or other casting has been announced for the "Roots" remake that will debut simultaneously on the History, A&E and Lifetime channels. Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Monopoly the board game, headed for the big screen
Wednesday Jul 1, 2015
Monopoly the board game, headed for the big screen

Lionsgate and manufacturer Hasbro have announced that the popular trading board game Monopoly will have its very own movie.It was announced on July 1 that one of the world's favorite family board games, Monopoly, is set to have its name in lights. Oscar-nominated and BAFTA award-winning writer/producer/director Andrew Niccol will write a screenplay based on the adventures of a boy from Baltic Avenue who uses Chance and Community along his journey. Niccol was the screenwriter behind "The Truman Show," "Gattaca" and "The Terminal." The movie will be produced by Lionsgate and Hasbro’s Allspark Pictures, and financed by Lionsgate. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2015. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Nicholas Winton, savior of Jewish children, dies at 106
Wednesday Jul 1, 2015
Nicholas Winton, savior of Jewish children, dies at 106

LONDON (AP) — He was just a 29-year-old clerk at the London Stock Exchange when he faced the challenge of a lifetime. Traveling with a friend to Czechoslovakia in 1938, as the drums of impending war echoed around Europe, Nicholas Winton was hit by a key realization. The country was in danger and no one was saving its Jewish children. Winton would almost single-handedly save more than 650 Jewish children from the Holocaust, earning himself the label "Britain's Schindler." He died Wednesday at age 106 in a hospital near Maidenhead, his hometown west of London, his family said. Winton arranged trains to carry children from Nazi-occupied Prague to Britain, battling bureaucracy at both ends and saving them from almost certain death. He then kept quiet about his exploits for a half-century. His daughter, Barbara, said she hoped her father would be remembered for his wicked sense of humor and charity work as well as his wartime heroism. And she hoped his legacy would be inspiring people to believe that even difficult things were possible. "He believed that if there was something that needed to be done you should do it," she said. "Let's not spend too long agonizing about stuff. Let's get it done." British Prime Minister David Cameron said "the world has lost a great man." Jonathan Sacks, Britain's former chief rabbi, said Winton "was a giant of moral courage and determination, and he will be mourned by Jewish people around the world." In Israel, President Reuven Rivlin said Winton will be remembered as a hero from "those darkest of times." "(He) was a man who valued human life above all else, and there are those who are alive today who are testament to his dedication and sacrifice," Rivlin said. Born in London on May 19, 1909, to parents of German Jewish descent, Winton himself was raised as a Christian. Late in 1938, a friend contacted him and told him to cancel the skiing holiday they had planned and travel instead to Czechoslovakia. Alarmed by the influx of refugees from the Sudetenland region recently annexed by Germany, Winton and his friend feared — correctly — that Czechoslovakia soon would be invaded by the Nazis and that its Jewish residents would be sent to concentration camps. While some in Britain were working to get Jewish intellectuals and communists out of Czechoslovakia, no one was trying to save the children — so Winton took that task upon himself. Returning to Britain, Winton persuaded British officials to accept children, as long as foster homes were found and a 50-pound guarantee was paid for each one to ensure they had enough money to return home later. At the time, their stays were only expected to be temporary. Setting himself up as the one-man children's section of the British Committee for Refugees from Czechoslovakia, Winton set about finding homes and guarantors, drawing up lists of about 6,000 children, publishing pictures to encourage British families to agree to take them. The first 20 children arrived by plane, but once the German army reached Prague in March 1939, they could only be brought out by train. In the months before the outbreak of World War II, eight trains carried children from Czechoslovakia through Germany to Britain. In all, Winton got 669 children out. The largest evacuation was scheduled for Sept. 3, 1939 — the day that Britain declared war on Germany. That train never left, and almost none of the 250 children trying to flee on it survived the war. The children from Prague were among some 10,000 mostly Jewish children who made it to Britain on what were known as the Kindertransports (children's transports). Few of them would see their parents again. Although many more Jewish children were saved from Berlin and Vienna, those operations were better organized and better financed. Winton's operation was unique because he worked almost alone. "Maybe a lot more could have been done. But much more time would have been needed, much more help would have been needed from other countries, much more money would have been needed, much more organization," Winton later said. He also acknowledged that not all the children who made it to Britain were well-treated in their foster homes — sometimes they were used as cheap domestic servants. "I wouldn't claim that it was 100 percent successful. But I would claim that everybody who came over was alive at the end of the war," he was quoted as saying in the book about the Kindertransports "Into the Arms of Strangers." Several of the children he saved grew up to have prominent careers, including filmmaker Karel Reisz, British politician Alf Dubs and Canadian journalist Joe Schlesinger. Winton served in the Royal Air Force during the war and continued to support refugee organizations. After the war, he became involved in numerous other charitable organizations, especially in Maidenhead. A keen fencer who lost his chance to compete at the Olympics because of the outbreak of World War II, Winton worked with his younger brother Bobby to found the Winton Cup, still a major team fencing competition in Britain. But for almost 50 years, Winton said nothing about what he had done before the war. It only emerged in 1988 when his wife Grete found documents in the attic of their home. "There are all kinds of things you don't talk about, even with your family," Winton said in 1999. "Everything that happened before the war actually didn't feel important in the light of the war itself." Winton's wife persuaded him to have his story documented. It became well-known in Britain after the BBC tracked down dozens of "Nicky's Children" and arranged an emotional reunion on prime-time television. A film about his heroism, "Nicholas Winton — The Power of Good," won an International Emmy Award in 2002. Then-Prime Minister Tony Blair praised him as "Britain's Schindler," after German businessman Oskar Schindler, who also saved Jewish lives during the war. Winton was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2003 and also honored in the Czech Republic, where last year he received the country's highest state honor, the Order of the White Lion. "He was a person I admired for his personal bravery," said Czech President Milos Zeman. A statue of Winton stands at Prague's central station, while a statue commemorating the children of the Kindertransport is a popular sight at London's Liverpool Street Station. Winton continued to attend Kindertransport events in Britain and the Czech Republic well beyond his 100th birthday. Still, he rejected the description of himself as a hero, insisting that unlike Schindler, his life had never been in danger. "At the time, everybody said, 'Isn't it wonderful what you've done for the Jews? You saved all these Jewish people,'" Winton said. "When it was first said to me, it came almost as a revelation. Because I didn't do it particularly for that reason. I was there to save children." Winton's wife Grete died in 1999. He is survived by his daughter Barbara, his son Nick and several grandchildren. ___ Associated Press writers Danica Kirka and Jill Lawless in London, Karel Janicek in Prague and Ian Deitch in Jerusalem contributed. Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Naomi Koppel from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Donna Karan stepping down as chief designer for her company
Tuesday Jun 30, 2015
Donna Karan stepping down as chief designer for her company

NEW YORK (AP) — Donna Karan will step down from daily duties as chief designer at her namesake company, Donna Karan International, to devote more time to her philanthropic foundation. She'll remain a close adviser, according to a company statement released Tuesday. Karan, 66, co-founded the company in 1984. It went public in 1996. And in 2001, LVMH Moet Hennessey Louis Vuitton invested and helped grow it globally. It now sells apparel, sportswear, accessories and shoes under the Donna Karan New York and DKNY brands. The company said it will not immediately seek to replace Karan as designer, suspending runway shows and collections for a "period of time." Karan, known for helping women streamline their look through basic pieces, expressed gratitude and "my deepest feelings" to colleagues. "Donna Karan New York is a part of me, past, present and future," she said in the statement. "It has been an honor to speak woman to woman about seven easy pieces that forever changed the way women dress." Reaction was swift as insiders lauded Karan as a visionary, with the Council of Fashion Designers of America tweeting: "The end of an era! Donna Karan departs DKI." Karan said she made the decision after much "soul-searching," adding: "I have arrived at a point in my life where I need to spend more time to pursue my Urban Zen commitment to its fullest potential." She was referring to Urban Zen Company and Foundation, a philanthropy that works around the world on health care and education. Urban Zen sells luxury goods in partnership with artisans, with proceeds benefiting projects. Pierre-Yves Roussel, chairman and CEO of LVMH Fashion Group, called it a privilege to collaborate with Karan and said LVMH was committed to "staying true to the spirit and value Donna has championed" for more than three decades. Early on, Karan's seven easy pieces provided a modern system for women with the goal of simplifying their wardrobes without sacrificing elegance or sensuality. With a younger, urban customer in mind, she added DKNY five years after starting the company. Among numerous accolades, the CFDA has honored her with its lifetime achievement award. Former President Bill Clinton presented her the Clinton Global Citizen Award. Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Leanne Italie from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Misty Copeland named first black female principal at ABT
Tuesday Jun 30, 2015
Misty Copeland named first black female principal at ABT

NEW YORK (AP) — Misty Copeland, the Missouri-born ballerina who's become a forceful voice for diversity in ballet and achieved a celebrity that far transcends that rarified world, was named principal dancer at American Ballet Theatre on Tuesday — the first African-American woman to reach that status in the company's 75-year history. Copeland, 32, fought tears as she spoke about her promotion, which she said was a lifetime dream — but such a difficult one to attain that she never really thought it would happen. "This is it," she said. "This has been my dream since I was 13, to be a principal dancer and reach these heights." "But it hasn't been overnight," she added at a hastily arranged news conference — a rarity for a ballet promotion. "It's been 14 years of extremely hard work ... I'm just so extremely honored to be an African-American and to be in this position." And, Copeland said, she hoped her ascension to the very top ranks of ballet would inspire other young dancers of color — "all the little girls" — to stick with their own dreams. "So many young dancers of color stop dancing at an early age because they just don't think there will be a career path for them," she said. "I hope that will change." She spoke of her own doubts when she joined the ABT corps at age 19 and saw no one "who looked like me." "I had moments of doubting myself and wanting to quit, because I didn't know if there would be a future for an African-American woman" at that level," she said. "At the same time, it made me so hungry to push through." The company announced the promotion six days after Copeland made her New York debut as Odette/Odile in "Swan Lake," one of the most important roles in a ballerina's repertoire. The emotional performance ended with Copeland being feted onstage by trailblazing black ballerinas of earlier generations, and with a sea of fans cheering and taking cellphone videos. Copeland has become increasingly famous over the past several years, achieving a pop culture status exceedingly rare for a ballet dancer. "We haven't had a ballet dancer who has broken through to popular culture like this since Mikhail Baryshnikov," said Wendy Perron, an author and the former editor of Dance Magazine. "And she's going to bring more attention from that world to ballet." In the past year, Copeland has appeared on the cover of Time magazine as one of the most influential figures of 2015, and written both a children's book, "Firebird," and a best-selling memoir, "Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina," which has been optioned for a movie. She also was the subject of a documentary at this year's Tribeca Film Festival. In recent years she's also performed in a music video with Prince, and been featured in a hugely popular online ad for Under Armour sportswear that shows her leaping and spinning in a studio, while a narrator recounts some of the negative feedback she received as a youngster, when she was told she had the wrong body for ballet and had started too late — at 13. The dancer also has appeared as a guest host on the Fox show "So You Think You Can Dance" and was a presenter at this year's Tony awards. Many who attended Copeland's historic "Swan Lake" performance last week noted what a diverse audience Copeland had drawn to the Metropolitan Opera House, where ABT performs its spring season. The crowd was filled with young girls — black and white — in their party dresses. "She singlehandedly made that a diverse audience," Perron said. Damian Woetzel, former principal dancer for New York City Ballet and now the director of the Vail International Dance Festival, called Copeland's rise "groundbreaking." "In the racially underrepresented world of ballet, Misty has already had an historic impact," Woetzel said in an email message. "Now, as a groundbreaking principal dancer, she will continue to inspire and make possible much-needed changes for our field and for the arts in America." Born in Kansas City, Copeland moved at age two to California, where, she noted at Tuesday's news conference, she first took ballet classes at the Boys & Girls Clubs of America — not, she said, a common path to becoming a ballerina for an elite company. She writes in her memoir that her childhood was defined by "packing, scrambling, leaving — and often barely surviving." But she became known as a local dance prodigy, despite her late start, and joined ABT's junior company at age 18, then the full company at 19. She became a soloist at age 24. Copeland is the first black ballerina and second black dancer overall to be a principal at ABT, after Desmond Richardson, who danced with the company in 1977-1978 and returned later as guest artist. At New York City Ballet, there has never been a black female principal, and only two black male principals. (One of them, Albert Evans, died last week at the age of 46.) In 1990, Lauren Anderson became a principal dancer at Houston Ballet — the first black female principal in the country. Anderson, now retired, was onstage at last week's "Swan Lake" curtain calls to give Copeland a huge hug and lift her off her feet. Copeland paid tribute on Tuesday. "It's not me up here," she said. "It's everyone who came before me and got me to this position." Also named an ABT principal dancer on Tuesday was longtime soloist Stella Abrera. In addition, Maria Kochetkova, a principal with the San Francisco Ballet, and Alban Lendorf, a principal with Royal Danish Ballet, are joining as principals, it was announced. Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Jocelyn Noveck from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.