Wednesday Jun 8, 2016

'Raging Bull' actress Theresa Saldana dies

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Theresa Saldana, the "Raging Bull" actress who survived a stalker's brutal attack to become a crime victim's advocate and reclaimed her entertainment career with "The Commish" and other TV shows, has died. She was 61. Saldana had been suffering from pneumonia and...
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TV

'Raging Bull' actress Theresa Saldana dies
Wednesday Jun 8, 2016
'Raging Bull' actress Theresa Saldana dies

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Theresa Saldana, the "Raging Bull" actress who survived a stalker's brutal attack to become a crime victim's advocate and reclaimed her entertainment career with "The Commish" and other TV shows, has died. She was 61. Saldana had been suffering from pneumonia and died Monday at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, according to her longtime friend, Soorya Townley, who called the actress a "warm, caring person who always put others' needs before her own. Saldana co-starred in the 1991-96 drama "The Commish" as the supportive wife of Michael Chiklis' police commissioner. Her most notable big-screen role was opposite Joe Pesci in "Raging Bull," Martin Scorsese's 1980 film starring Robert De Niro. "I have such good memories of working with her on 'Raging Bull,' and I always admired the way that she handled the horrifying attack by a stalker — the good that she made of it," Scorsese said. "She was a wonderful actress and a fine human being." In 1982, Saldana was repeatedly stabbed by an obsessed man in front of her West Hollywood apartment. The attack was stopped by a then-water deliveryman, Jeff Fenn, who held the man for police. Scottish drifter Arthur Jackson served more than a decade in prison for the crime before he was extradited to Great Britain to face charges in a case there. Saldana, who endured a prolonged hospitalization, was both physically and mentally scarred and received treatment for both problems. She went on to found a support and lobbying group, Victims for Victims, and played herself in the 1984 TV movie "Victims For Victims: The Theresa Saldana Story." She also wrote "Beyond Survival," a memoir. In a 1992 interview with The Associated Press, Saldana said her recovery was long in coming but complete. "It's been a decade and it's over now, finally," she said. "If someone brings it up I remember, but I don't think about it all the time. It's certainly not a formidable part of my life anymore. I'm happy and excited. I'm doing really well." She and actor Phil Peters, who had a recurring role on "The Commish" as police Sgt. William Frawley, married in 1989 and had a daughter, Tianna. Saldana was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1954 and was adopted at five days by an Italian-Puerto Rican family. Her first film appearances came in 1978 with "I Wanna Hold Your Hand" and "Nunzio." Other movie credits included "Defiance," ''The Evil That Men Do" and "Gang Warz." Her TV credits included "T.J. Hooker" and "Matlock" in the early and mid-1980s, "Diagnosis Murder" in the '90s and "The Bernie Mac Show" in 2003. Copyright (2016) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Lynn Elber from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Watch: 'Marco Polo' Season 2 trailer
Wednesday Jun 8, 2016
Watch: 'Marco Polo' Season 2 trailer

Lorenzo Richelmy returns as the title character and explorer of the Mongolian Empire in a first trailer for July 2016's second season of "Marco Polo" on Netflix.The two-minute reel sets expectations for a 10-episode season due to drop July 1, with Marco Polo conscripted into the order of the Mongol Knights as the Empire's violent growth faces new challenges. Benedict Wong of "The Martian" and "Prometheus" returns as Kublai Khan in a cast that includes Olivia Cheng, Jean Chen, Zhy Zhu, Mahesh Jadu, Michelle Yeoh, Rick Yune and Uli Latukefu. Marco Polo Season 2 trailer: youtu.be/OXfgvcJ5T8E, facebook.com/MarcoPoloMP/videos/1044389592295431 Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2016. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Video consumes vast majority of US data traffic: report
Wednesday Jun 8, 2016
Video consumes vast majority of US data traffic: report

PriceWaterhouseCoopers' "Global entertainment and media outlook 2016-2020" study estimates that online video consumed 82.1% of data traffic in the USA for 2015.Film, TV/video, music, internet advertising, and video games will change in the most impactful way over the period 2016 to 2020, said PwC. Event cinema, video game adaptations, local-language content will impact film, while China will become the world's top movie market in 2017; in TV, online delivery is "the new normal," with online home video already bigger than the box office. Live music experiences will continue to increase in importance, with digital streaming the predominant form of consumption and subscription services accounting for 80% of industry revenue. Virtual reality was identified as an "exciting area of growth" within video games, and competitive gaming, known as eSports, will benefit from increased local awareness in the US. For advertisers, mobile is of the most interest, with paid search and online video internet advertising to grow rapidly, as long as the challenges of transparency, ad fraud and privacy can be adequately dealt with. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2016. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

A summer bounty of TV drama, comedies and even a 'Hamilton'
Wednesday Jun 8, 2016
A summer bounty of TV drama, comedies and even a 'Hamilton'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Summer travel packing list: swimsuit, sunblock, television. In this portable TV era, there's no reason to leave small-screen entertainment at home when cable channels, streaming services and networks are eager to keep you connected online with top-notch fare from, among others, Oscar-owning filmmakers. So hit the road with your smartphone, laptop or tablet — or, heck, stay put in front of an actual TV set — and check out this steamy-weather menu of hot picks (all times EDT). — "BrainDead," CBS, 10 p.m. Monday, June 13. A different political show from "The Good Wife" creators Robert and Michelle King, with Washington beset by brain-eating bugs and a bipartisan coalition out to stop them. Tony Shalhoub and Broadway and TV "Grease" heartthrob Aaron Tveit are among the comic thriller's stars. — "Animal Kingdom," TNT, 9 p.m. Monday, June 14. A teenager (Finn Cole) loses his mother to a heroin overdose and gains a violent family that includes a tough matriarch (Ellen Barkin) and her offspring in the drama series based on the Australian movie of the same name. — "Raised by Wolves," Acorn TV streaming service, Monday, June 20. A bluntly funny take on the lives of an unconventional single mother and her six home-schooled kids from writers Caitlin and Caroline Moran, sisters who lived a version of the comedy series. — "Queen of the South," USA, 10 p.m. Thursday, June 23. Drawn from the best-selling novel "La Reina Del Sur," which already spawned a hit telenovela, the drama stars Alice Braga ("I Am Legend") as a woman on the run in the U.S. from a drug trafficking ring after her boyfriend's murder. —"Dancing On the Edge," PBS, 8 p.m. Sunday, June 26. An eight-part drama about a black jazz band that finds success and tragedy in 1930s London. Chiwetel Ejiofor ("12 Years A Slave") and Matthew Goode (aka Lady Mary's squeeze in "Downton Abbey") are part of the cast. — "Alexander Hamilton," History Channel, 9 p.m. Sunday, June 26. Finding tickets to the Broadway hit musical "Hamilton" too pricey? This two-hour documentary detailing his national legacy may leave you singing the founding father's praises. — "Roadies," Showtime, 10 p.m. Sunday, June 26. Rock stars ruled in filmmaker Cameron Crowe's Oscar-winning "Almost Famous," but it's the crew members who shine in the comedy series written and directed by Crowe. Luke Wilson, Carla Gugino and Keisha Castle-Hughes are part of the ensemble cast. — "Hello World!" Discovery Channel, 8 p.m. Saturday, July 9. The family friendly series enlists the narration and tunes of Christina Aguilera, Usher, Joan Jett and others to educate us about wild animals and their habitats. — "The Night Of," HBO, 9 p.m. Sunday, July 10. A start-to-finish murder case as created by one Oscar-winning writer, Steven Zaillian ("Schindler's List") and one Oscar-nominated one, Richard Price ("The Color of Money"), with an assist from Peter Moffat, whose original U.K. series it's adapted from. John Turturro, Riz Ahmed star. — "The A Word," SundanceTV, 10 p.m. Wednesday, July 13. Both autism and adultery figure in this series, described as both thoughtful and humorous, about a 5-year-old boy and his extended family. — "The Get Down," Netflix, Friday, Aug. 12. New York circa 1970s is the setting for this music-saturated drama about South Bronx teenagers in a harsh and changing world. Extravagant filmmaker Baz Luhrmann ("Moulin Rouge!") directed and produced the series with young actors (Justice Smith, Shameik Moore) and veterans (Jimmy Smits, Giancarlo Esposito). ___ Lynn Elber can be reached at lelber@ap.org and on Twitter at http://twitter.com/lynnelber Copyright (2016) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Lynn Elber from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Lawsuit: Ellen DeGeneres mocked woman's name for breast joke
Wednesday Jun 8, 2016
Lawsuit: Ellen DeGeneres mocked woman's name for breast joke

MACON, Ga. (AP) — A Georgia real estate agent is suing the producer of the "The Ellen DeGeneres Show," claiming the comedian mispronounced her name to make a joke about breasts. Titi (TEE'-tee) Pierce alleges in the lawsuit filed against Warner Bros. last week that DeGeneres displayed one of Pierce's real estate signs during the Feb. 22 show that was rerun April 15. It says DeGeneres led into the joke about Pierce's name after showing a sign for the unrelated Nipple Convalescent Home. The suit also says the sign included Pierce's cellphone number and she was subjected to "ridiculing and harassing" phone calls. The suit claims invasion of privacy, defamation and emotional distress. It seeks unspecified monetary damages. Warner Bros. declined to comment on the suit. Copyright (2016) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Movies

'Raging Bull' actress Theresa Saldana dies
Wednesday Jun 8, 2016
'Raging Bull' actress Theresa Saldana dies

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Theresa Saldana, the "Raging Bull" actress who survived a stalker's brutal attack to become a crime victim's advocate and reclaimed her entertainment career with "The Commish" and other TV shows, has died. She was 61. Saldana had been suffering from pneumonia and died Monday at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, according to her longtime friend, Soorya Townley, who called the actress a "warm, caring person who always put others' needs before her own. Saldana co-starred in the 1991-96 drama "The Commish" as the supportive wife of Michael Chiklis' police commissioner. Her most notable big-screen role was opposite Joe Pesci in "Raging Bull," Martin Scorsese's 1980 film starring Robert De Niro. "I have such good memories of working with her on 'Raging Bull,' and I always admired the way that she handled the horrifying attack by a stalker — the good that she made of it," Scorsese said. "She was a wonderful actress and a fine human being." In 1982, Saldana was repeatedly stabbed by an obsessed man in front of her West Hollywood apartment. The attack was stopped by a then-water deliveryman, Jeff Fenn, who held the man for police. Scottish drifter Arthur Jackson served more than a decade in prison for the crime before he was extradited to Great Britain to face charges in a case there. Saldana, who endured a prolonged hospitalization, was both physically and mentally scarred and received treatment for both problems. She went on to found a support and lobbying group, Victims for Victims, and played herself in the 1984 TV movie "Victims For Victims: The Theresa Saldana Story." She also wrote "Beyond Survival," a memoir. In a 1992 interview with The Associated Press, Saldana said her recovery was long in coming but complete. "It's been a decade and it's over now, finally," she said. "If someone brings it up I remember, but I don't think about it all the time. It's certainly not a formidable part of my life anymore. I'm happy and excited. I'm doing really well." She and actor Phil Peters, who had a recurring role on "The Commish" as police Sgt. William Frawley, married in 1989 and had a daughter, Tianna. Saldana was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1954 and was adopted at five days by an Italian-Puerto Rican family. Her first film appearances came in 1978 with "I Wanna Hold Your Hand" and "Nunzio." Other movie credits included "Defiance," ''The Evil That Men Do" and "Gang Warz." Her TV credits included "T.J. Hooker" and "Matlock" in the early and mid-1980s, "Diagnosis Murder" in the '90s and "The Bernie Mac Show" in 2003. Copyright (2016) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Lynn Elber from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Video consumes vast majority of US data traffic: report
Wednesday Jun 8, 2016
Video consumes vast majority of US data traffic: report

PriceWaterhouseCoopers' "Global entertainment and media outlook 2016-2020" study estimates that online video consumed 82.1% of data traffic in the USA for 2015.Film, TV/video, music, internet advertising, and video games will change in the most impactful way over the period 2016 to 2020, said PwC. Event cinema, video game adaptations, local-language content will impact film, while China will become the world's top movie market in 2017; in TV, online delivery is "the new normal," with online home video already bigger than the box office. Live music experiences will continue to increase in importance, with digital streaming the predominant form of consumption and subscription services accounting for 80% of industry revenue. Virtual reality was identified as an "exciting area of growth" within video games, and competitive gaming, known as eSports, will benefit from increased local awareness in the US. For advertisers, mobile is of the most interest, with paid search and online video internet advertising to grow rapidly, as long as the challenges of transparency, ad fraud and privacy can be adequately dealt with. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2016. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

'Suicide Squad' hits PG-13 target
Wednesday Jun 8, 2016
'Suicide Squad' hits PG-13 target

August anti-hero movie "Suicide Squad" has nailed its anticipated PG-13 rating for US cinemas, even after February's "Deadpool" became a blockbuster with its rare R-rating.The Warner Bros movie has a host of DC Comics super villains recruited by a secret government agency; they'll be set free should they manage to somehow complete and survive their suicide mission. Jared Leto is the newest incarnation of The Joker, with cast members also including Will Smith (Deadshot), Margot Robbie (Harley Quinn), Adewale Akinnouye-Agbaje (Killer Croc) and Cara Delevingne (Enchantress); Ben Affleck is also set to appear as Batman, and Viola Davis as the crew's agency boss. While "Deadpool" romped to a $772m box office on the back of a rare superhero movie R-rating -- 2008's "Punisher: War Zone" developed a noteworthy following only after its time in theaters had drawn to a close -- and "Batman v. Superman" being prepared for an R-rated Ultimate Edition on DVD from June 28, there was some speculation that "Suicide Squad" might go the same route. But the PG-13 rating enables Warner's August tentpole to reach as wide an audience as possible, establishing a stronger platform for more movies further down the line. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2016. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Harry Potter play gets rave reviews
Wednesday Jun 8, 2016
Harry Potter play gets rave reviews

Harry Potter's stage debut got a standing ovation from a packed theatre audience in a new London play that imagines the fictional boy wizard as a grown-up father of three, British media reported on Wednesday."Judging by the whooping and cheering, nobody was disappointed," Clare Fitzimons wrote in The Mirror after the first showing of "Harry Potter and the Cursed Child" at the Palace Theatre. "It was phenomenal, it really was. It lived up to all the hype," said one fan interviewed by the BBC, while another in a Potter-style cape said: "This completely blew me away. J. K. Rowling did an amazing job." Potter creator Rowling made a special request for fans to keep the plot secret and the 1,500 audience members were handed badges reading "#KeepTheSecrets". "The storyline, a hymn to friendship and teenage misfits, contains enough twists to please the most knowledgeable of fans," Hannah Furness wrote in The Daily Telegraph. "Any fears that the world of Hogwarts on stage would struggle to compete with the multimillion-dollar special effects of film were quickly kicked into touch". "Has Rowling done it again? The audience was in no doubt," she wrote. The plot for the play reads: "While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. "As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes, darkness comes from unexpected places," it said. The show officially opens on July 30 and is set to be published as a book on July 31, which is Rowling's and Harry Potter's birthday. Rowling's books have sold more than 450 million copies since 1997 and been adapted into eight films. The show is written by English screenwriter and playwright Jack Thorne, based on an original story co-written with Rowling and the play's director John Tiffany. Given the millions of fans around the world, the decision to move the characters on two decades was seen as risky. Like many of his fans, Potter has now grown up in the play and has three children with his wife Ginny Weasley, the sister of his friend Ron. He is working at the Ministry of Magic. He still has his trademark round-rimmed glasses and the scar on his head, a permanent reminder of his nemesis Lord Voldemort, but must now help his youngest son Albus confront the family's dark past. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2016. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

'Jason Bourne' movie issues explosive TV spot
Wednesday Jun 8, 2016
'Jason Bourne' movie issues explosive TV spot

A 30-second clip for July's fifth entry to the Bourne franchise promises an all-action movie whose plot calls rogue agent Jason Bourne out of the shadows one more time.Matt Damon returns as Jason Bourne, with Julia Stiles as Nicky Parsons who, having been his agency handler at one point, lets him know that the secretive training programs he sought to dismantle have returned with a vengeance. Fortunately for fans of the franchise, so has Bourne himself, and this time he's got an advantage -- "I know everything," says the former amnesiac. Some viewers feel that they too now know too much, identifying what could be a potential spoiler halfway through the clip. Also involved in the film are Tommy Lee Jones ("Captain America: Civil War"), Alicia Vikander ("Ex Machina"), Ato Essandoh ("Django Unchained"), Riz Ahmed ("Rogue One: A Star Wars Story"), and Vincent Cassel ("Black Swan.") "Jason Bourne" starts its international rollout the week of July 29, 2016, including territories such as the USA, Canada, the UK and Ireland, Australia, Brazil, Hong Kong, the Netherlands and Singapore. Japanese showings commence from October 7. Jason Bourne TV spot: youtu.be/ApNnmNNvW8o, twitter.com/jasonbourne/status/740236183569997824, facebook.com/TheBourneSeries/videos/1219039824802806 Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2016. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Events

Aside from 'Hamilton,' Revolutionary era inspires little art
Wednesday Jun 29, 2016
Aside from 'Hamilton,' Revolutionary era inspires little art

NEW YORK (AP) — Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and 11 Tony Awards, "Hamilton" is a cultural phenomenon that stands as the most celebrated work of art ever inspired by the American Revolution. The competition is remarkably thin. While the Civil War, World War II and the Vietnam War have inspired acclaimed movies, plays, poems and novels, from Stephen Crane's "The Red Badge of Courage" to Steven Spielberg's "Saving Private Ryan," notable works about the American Revolution are rare outside of history books. At 240 years since the country's birth, the tiny pantheon includes the musical "1776," the paintings of Gilbert Stuart and Emanuel Leutze, the poems "Paul Revere's Ride" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and "Concord Hymn" by Ralph Waldo Emerson, and the HBO adaptation of David McCullough's "John Adams" that starred Paul Giamatti and Laura Linney. "The founding era exists on the other side of a cultural and even sartorial divide," says historian Ron Chernow, whose biography of Alexander Hamilton is the basis for Lin-Manuel Miranda's hip-hop musical. "We know the founders only through paintings and engravings, which seems to distance them from us." "The neglect has been quite shameful," Chernow added, "at least until Lin-Manuel Miranda came along." The deficit of Revolutionary War art began even as the battle for independence was being fought. The U.S. had no literary scene of note at the time of its founding and no distinctively American literary culture until well into the 19th century. While other wars produced memorable firsthand accounts, whether Norman Mailer's World War II novel, "The Naked and the Dead," or Iraq War veteran Phil Klay's prize-winning story collection "Redeployment," the vast majority of works about the American Revolution are based on archival material. Filmmakers have almost entirely bypassed the Revolution. There have been no major productions about the Declaration of Independence, the drafting of the Constitution, George Washington's crossing of the Delaware River or the dire winter in Valley Forge. No actor has given a performance as Washington, Thomas Jefferson or Benjamin Franklin as indelible as Daniel Day-Lewis' starring role in Spielberg's "Lincoln." "The Founding Fathers are sacred, near-mythical creatures; one portrays them at one's peril. Moses might be easier," says historian Stacy Schiff, whose book on Franklin, "A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Birth of America," came out in 2005. The ever-popular Franklin and the traitorous Benedict Arnold have been the subjects of TV miniseries, but not big-screen biographies. Walter Isaacson's "Benjamin Franklin," published in 2003, is the basis for an upcoming documentary by Ken Burns. "I prefer Burns to a feature film," Isaacson told The Associated Press, saying he thought a documentary would be more effective. "... That said, if someone wants to make a feature film on the delightful Ben Franklin, I am happy to help, and I'm sure he would merrily wink at us through his newfangled bifocals." The few movies set in the Revolutionary era include the 1995 Merchant Ivory production "Jefferson in Paris," a drama starring Nick Nolte that had mixed reviews and flopped at the box office, and "The Patriot," directed by Roland Emmerich and featuring Mel Gibson as an American who leads a militia after his home and family are brutalized by the British. The film received Oscar nominations in 2001 for music, sound and cinematography, but it was widely criticized for inaccuracies, with historian David Hackett Fisher writing that "The Patriot" is to history "as Godzilla was to biology." Hollywood has so resisted stories of early American history that Emmerich acknowledges that if his current movie, the sci-fi spectacular "Independence Day: Resurgence," was actually set in 1776, it's unlikely the film would have been made. Emmerich says that even while making "The Patriot," he was aware that other parts of American history were more popular. "I was surprised that even the crew members seemed to have no idea what that time period was about. They thought we were going to make a Civil War movie," he says. Historical novels are far more common, if not more acclaimed. Gore Vidal's scandalous "Burr," about Aaron Burr, who killed Hamilton in a duel, and Howard Fast's lively "Citizen Tom Paine" were best-sellers in their time, but they don't match the stature of Walt Whitman's Civil War poems or Ernest Hemingway's World War I novel "A Farewell to Arms." Vidal biographer Jay Parini, who believes "Burr" will continue to engage readers, finds it "sad that the best novels of the American Revolution were written so long ago." He praised a 1940 novel by Kenneth Roberts, "Oliver Wiswell," and Fast's "Citizen Tom Paine," which came out in 1943. "These two books have a lingering popularity among avid readers, but they have mostly fallen out of sight," Parini said. Several novelists have taken on the story of Thomas Jefferson and the slave with whom he conceived children, Sally Hemings. Parini enjoyed a recent novel, "Thomas Jefferson Dreams of Sally Hemings," by Stephen O'Connor. In 1979, Barbara Chase-Riboud's best-selling "Sally Hemings" infuriated historians and Jefferson partisans with the then-unproven contention that he had physical relations with the slave. Sally Cabot Gunning's "Monticello: A Daughter and Her Father," coming out in September, centers on Jefferson and daughter Martha Jefferson Randolph, who despises slavery but knows the family home depends on it. "I just wanted to jump down into her world and get inside her head," says Gunning, whose previous books include "Benjamin Franklin's Bastard," a 2014 novel about the son Franklin had out of wedlock. Hamilton will be the subject of a novel due in August, Elizabeth Cobbs' "The Hamilton Affair," the story of his marriage to Elizabeth Schuyler. Cobbs, whose previous books include the Civil War novel "Broken Promises" and a series of textbooks on American history, says she began the Hamilton novel a few years ago and was anxious to create an engaging story about the Revolutionary era, "not ever having read one I liked." "They all seemed so stilted, or perhaps just dated. Take a peek at Irving Stone's clunker on Abigail and John Adams, 'Those Who Love.' I challenge you to stay awake past page 20," she told the AP, adding that she found Hamilton a far more positive figure than she had first believed. "And then I met Eliza, who touched my heart. I felt they had both gotten a bum rap, long before I knew ... (Hamilton) might be turned into a rapper." Copyright (2016) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Hillel Italie from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Martial arts drama 'Into the Badlands' adds LaToya Morgan
Tuesday Jun 28, 2016
Martial arts drama 'Into the Badlands' adds LaToya Morgan

AMC's second season of "Into the Badlands" is gaining Image Award-nominated writer LaToya Morgan as work continues on the 2017 show.Morgan most recently collaborated with AMC on "Turn: Washington's Spies," for which Episode 2 of Season 3, "False Flag," won her a NAACP Image Award nod. She also has credits on "American Horror Story: The Orderly," dramatic comedy "Shameless," and crime thriller "Complications"; future projects include a biopic of civil rights icon Angela Davis, as Deadline reports. The first season of "Into the Badlands" starred Daniel Wu of action film "New Police Story," Emily Beecham ("Hail, Caesar,") Orla Brady ("Wuthering Heights,") Sarah Bolger ("The Tudors,") and Aramis Knight ("Teen Wolf.") It was nominated for Best Genre Series at February 2016's Satellite Awards ceremony. Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2016. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Watch: The Strokes host surreal and sinister chase in 'Threat of Joy'
Tuesday Jun 28, 2016
Watch: The Strokes host surreal and sinister chase in 'Threat of Joy'

The first official video from June EP "Future Present Past" follows the fate of a different, missing music video as The Strokes play through third track "Threat of Joy."Ostensibly a treatment for "Oblivius," the second track on June 3 release "Future Present Past," the music video for "Threat of Joy" follows a suited official, women in black, SWAT team members, and pig-masked businessmen on a 5 minute jaunt in pursuit of a missing reel of film. The award-winning New York band broke through in 2001 with debut album "Is This It" and singles "Last Nite" and "Hard to Explain." One live show is currently scheduled for the remainder of 2016, with an appearance set for July 22nd at the Splendour in the Grass Festival in Byron Bay, NSW, Australia. Official music video: youtu.be/IJNgvS-sA-s Copyright AFP Relaxnews, 2016. This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Review: 'New York Spectacular' reinvents itself quite nicely
Tuesday Jun 28, 2016
Review: 'New York Spectacular' reinvents itself quite nicely

NEW YORK (AP) — New York City is all about reinvention. Want to change something about yourself? Sure, go right ahead. As Taylor Swift sings in her love song to the city: "Everybody here was someone else before." Now it turns out even the Rockettes aren't immune. A year or so after creating a nonstop, messy, sloppy show as part of their hope to create a non-Christmas event, the Rockettes star in a sleek, pretty summer musical at Radio City Music Hall. It's got new songs, a new story and a new look. It's reinvented, New York-style. "The New York Spectacular," written by Douglas Carter Beane and directed by Mia Michaels, focuses on a pair of siblings visiting New York who get separated from mom and dad. The city's famous statues come to life to help guide them to a reunion. Like all reinventions, the things that worked in the past have stayed, including the Rockettes' magical tap-dancing number in real rain, the animatronic recreations of the Statue of Liberty and Central Park's Alice in Wonderland, a fashion number with Madonna's "Vogue" and the LED jackets on the dancers in Times Square. Beane's often-too-sweet script — the older sister learns during her day to abandon sarcasm and embrace her inner child — is also peppered with jokes only adults will get. (When one of the kids discovers the Naked Cowboy in Times Square isn't really naked, a character retorts: "You can thank the Board of Health for that.") Beane also gets in a few digs at Anna Wintour and Donald Trump. Michaels, the "So You Think You Can Dance" judge, has taken over all choreography and directing duty — in the first one she did only the opening number — and her editing is as sharp as her twitchy, leg-lifting touches. She knows the stars of the show are the Rockettes — and they shine. There's something remarkable about watching 40 women dance in unison that never dulls. The 90-minute show features pop songs like Swift's "Welcome to New York," Jay Z's "Empire State of Mind" and the Beatles' "Strawberry Fields Forever" as well as classic tunes like "New York, New York" and "Cheek to Cheek." The two lions that guard the New York Public Library do A Tribe Called Quest-inspired original rap and Vivaldi is heard during a visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The show meanders into some weird places, like an almost lascivious portrayal of corporate greed on Wall Street to the tune of "Money, Money" (especially interesting for a show prominently sponsored by Chase bank), and has an unwillingness to cut good musical moments that have no real statute tie-ins. But there's plenty of magic here, particularly Tony Award-nominee Emilio Sosa's bright costumes and projections by Moment Factory that mix high-definition photos, bright animation, 3-D elements, live-action footage and complex LED sequences like the subway and the Empire State Building. In the last Rockettes spring show, everyone got garish wristbands that lit up and throbbed in time to the beat. It was a little too Chuck E. Cheese. In this one, hundreds of tiny lights attached to little wings float down like butterflies. It's simply prettier and classier this time. "The New York Spectacular" might not be perfect, but it's made huge steps in both editing and technology. It's reinventing itself quite nicely — like any other New Yorker. ___ Mark Kennedy on Twitter at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits Copyright (2016) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Mark Kennedy from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Jimmy Buffett musical unveils creative team and new name
Monday Jun 27, 2016
Jimmy Buffett musical unveils creative team and new name

NEW YORK (AP) — The Jimmy Buffett musical making its world premiere next year in California has a new name and a Tony Award-winning creative support team. The musical, now titled "Escape to Margaritaville," will feature choreography by Kelly Devine ("Rocky"), scenic design by Walt Spangler ("Tuck Everlasting"), costumes by Paul Tazewell ("Hamilton"), lighting by Howell Binkley ("Hamilton") and sound design by Brian Ronan ("If/Then.") The show, combining Buffett's tunes with an original story by writers Greg Garcia and Mike O'Malley, will start grooving onstage in May 2017 at La Jolla Playhouse. Playhouse artistic director Christopher Ashley will direct. Buffett has written such beach-bum classics as "A Pirate Looks at Forty," ''Margaritaville," ''Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes" and "Cheeseburger in Paradise." ___ Online: http://www.lajollaplayhouse.org ___ Follow Mark Kennedy on Twitter at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits Copyright (2016) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was written by Mark Kennedy from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.